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environments. but i did come away with the conclusion that it's absolutely vital that parents and staff and student come together around a shared vision of culture. either organically or through the very hard process of mutual dialogue and understanding. and i think the book shows the success that can happen when -- that can occur when that happens and the struggles a school will encounter if it doesn't. and as one example, one of the schools i followed, which struggled quite a bit in its first year, did have this one sort of amazing success on that point. the principal early on in the year introduced the students to the wolf fable, and the fable is there are two wolves inside us that are constantly fighting, and one wolf represents greed and anger and the other wolf represents love and humility. and the moral is that the wolf that wins at the end is the one you feed. and that 'really took on a life of its own at this school and among the kids, and students would tell each other to remember to be the good wolf, or to make sure that the go wolf wins in the end. i think at successful scho
and in the near earth environment. our ability to understand the system is of growing importance to our nation's economy and national security. the electric power industry is susceptible to geomagnetic light induced currents which can overload unprotected power grids and result in widespread power outages. in the spacecraft industry, intense geomagnetic storms have the capacity to disrupt normal operation such as satellite communication, and, of course, they pose risks to astronauts in space. in addition, space weather can cause irregular areas in the signals from our very important global positioning systems. the national oceanic and atmospheric administration, or noaa is the official source for space weather prediction for the nation. several of nasa's research satellites have become essential part of our nation's space weather prediction system providing very important data for determined to space weather conditions. one such mission is the advanced composition explorer which sits in the solar wind ahead of the earth providing early warning of incoming solar storms. finally, orbital debris
division civil, criminal and thÉrÈse, and grants a natural resource and environment. then make recommendations, which go to the assistance. sometimes there's an internal conflict. the department of justice include the criminal division and those people always want to defend guards and seized their presence. sublimates divisions tends to favor and somebody has to resolve those on assistant to the solicitor general may think the criminal division statutory. prosecution is weak. the solicitor general has to resolve those issues. bob bork connected many not only within the government, but also here presentations by private counsel. it's one of the else's traditions that anyone that he can't come kerry i can be hurt by the solicitor general personally for united states files a brief in the supreme court. but prepared carefully and as sharp questions at these meetings. as he said in the book, he tried to advance the position of the executive branch, not his own fears. i never saw him favors on position and misunderstand. you conflate knowledge, understanding and intellectual integrit
grew up in many an environment -- in an environment where we did tend to look to the west for support or help, but i have a lot of friends who grew up on the other side of the divide who don't see the u.s. the way my friends or my family do. but inevitably, america's a superpower, and it comes with sharp elbows sometimes and big motorcades and big fortresses as embassies. and that can be a bit grating on the local population. so it was really interesting or perhaps, um, revealing for me to be on the other side all of a sudden. it's just a totally different prism through which to look at the issue, to look at the eshoo, the to look at my own country. and i arrived, you know, i'm in the convoy, and i'm sitting there in the convoy and just a few cars ahead of me is another car in that same motorcade surrounded by security escort. this is the secretary of state, and there is jeffrey feldman, um, who is now assistant secretary of state at the state department who used to be ambassador to beirut, and it was his convoy that used to annoy people in beirut, that used to annoy me when i was stu
shifting the inefficient model of growth. i said it's no good to be poor in a beautiful environment, but nor is it good to be well off but live with the consequences of environmental degradation. we need to develop a new thinking on development, and pursue that the element in a scientific way. first, we shouldn't incur any new problems, and we need to raise environmental threshold. second, we need to speed up efforts to overcome long-standing problems, which include phasing out backward production facilities. we will face the situation and punish the offenders without mercy, and enforce the law with an iron fist. [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] >> translator: we shouldn't pursue economic growth at the expense of the environment. such growth will set by the people. it's very important that the extent of pollution, the real food safety situation, and the efforts of our cleanup, results our cleanup efforts must be made public so that the people and media organizations can supervise the government's efforts to more fully and more effectively. this will also in a
flying about 70 satellites. so we're pretty familiar with the space environment and the risks it entails. as a global fleet operator serving both commercial and government customers, reliability and continuity of service are our highest priorities. whether it's uav operations over afghanistan or the final game of the ncaa tournament or financial statements that have to be transferred securely around the world, um, we know that our customers expect flawless performance. to deliver this level of performance, we have to daily deal with a range of threats. probably a highest priority for us today is radio frequency interference. many times it's accidental, sometimes intentional. space debris and other challenges of space flight, cyber attacks, solar weather, space systems reliability, the fact that we today don't have an affordable technical solution for refueling and repairing satellites on orbit and last but not least, an international launch industry that's far from robust. now, our economy depends on the ability to create and instantly distribute vast amounts of data around the planet. s
here. we are not simply here to hold their hand. we want a friendly environment for them. this is the kind of place we want them to feel it's open to consider new ideas but my job is to take them and give them some of those new ideas but challenge them to think in new ways they haven't before. >> host: can you predict who would be successful and who wouldn't? >> guest: at first, no because most of the students that we get are going to be successful so that's the good news but the first meeting, know it's impossible to determine who will be successful than others. >> host: what are the downfalls? >> guest: there are lots and lots of distractions here or at any other universities that is currently the biggest downfall which isn't paying attention to what they need to do. so not going to class, not getting assignments done, that is the most important thing in terms of making sure they have the best opportunity to succeed. >> host: what is the most common question students ask? >> guest: what's going to be on the test and that isn't the right question to be asking. what they
and local authorities that meet globally every year and the networking cities around work and environment, transportation, immigration, security, and a number of other issues. i hadn't heard of it two years ago. i doubt too many people other than that the urban specialists in the room have heard of it. but it is a living organization. most people would say i know what you mean the american conference of mayors, sister cities, maybe. but they pale in the context of the actual inner city organizations literally hundreds of them. some regional, some of national, some with global scope that exist. the forty cities working on forty or fifty eight cities working on global environment doing a better job. mayors running the world. city protocol and new organization, barcelona that shares best practicing clare, the counsel of local authority, the climate alliance. achievings in the nations states are lock up. unable to make any real progress. they are actually doing things important things together, and they do it because when you look at cities, the approach to govern mans, the approach to citize
that made this environment possible. >> smith was the director of the whole school, right. for many years he took over after elizabeth irwin died. >> right. [inaudible] a couple years after she died. he was asked if he had communist teachers and he told them it was none of their business. >> that's right. and he was more than i think being a sort of old left sort of new york fellow, she was a new england yankee sort of the high. not necessarily liberal, a more independent yankee. they don't talk about him a lot. angelo spoke about him very fondly because she remembers that when she first came to the school, she came a week before the school opened, to sort of get oriented with the people who were -- who she was staying with and she just remembers him smiling at her and being very courtly and proper which i think was, you know, a good reminded her of the south because it was just amazing to her when she went around to that teachers and she was calling him by their firstname and they were in jeans. she said i think maybe i made a horrible mistake. maybe my mother was right. [laughter] >> did t
been here longer. it's not the kind of environment that the achievers want to go into and stay in and it doesn't make teachers feel valued at all. i got in a little bit of trouble the other night because i was giving a speech in california. and i was lamenting the fact that the teachers don't get paid enough to it i said think about this. i said basketball players. now, why my husband is a former nba player. this is why i got in trouble at home to it i said basketball players get paid $12 million a year for troubling of all -- dribbling around. we should be 12 million to our highly effective teachers in the nation because they are determining the future of our nation. but we have a skewed culture where we don't actually respect and honor teachers for the incredible work that they do. we certainly don't pay them what they are worth. >> in australia they have 200 days of public schools. in china and india is 200 days of public school instruction. in the united states, why do you think in the united states it is only 180 days? which is drastic if you take between china and india i
institutions and environment with access to care. we had conversation and a disruption and we also have to acknowledge treatment and trust. it also have access to the system. it is not just going to be about what the benefits look like. but whether we can educate americans that are impacted. we need to have access to these health care services that they need at the end of the day. we are talking about what we know. including age and race. people of color are less likely to experience that in health care system. there is a story behind that that we have not necessarily gone to the heart. but we are really going to address health care, we really need to take about this and there has to be a way to address these populations that continue to experience this. our health care is overwhelming impacted by this. we are going to start to appropriate this. >> i think that the fact it is said that, i wonder if that is a the question that we have an answer just yet. like what is the accountability in the system itself and how is a transforming. how do we tackle that. >> [inaudible] >> we have conver
to emergency. still a tough environment to be operating for the foreseeable future. you think you will be able to improve upon the final management that has been made in the past five years? the senate version of fiscal year continue resolution that we passed yesterday in the senate cuts about $17 million from the department's management functions, and just tell us what could be the practical impact of reduction of that nature. for example, does this put in jeopardy to departments ability to do rigorous views of rigorous reviews that gao recommends? >> you don't run an operational department without the bill to hire, retain and manage. without the bill to procure goods and services without the ability run your financial system from and accountability point of view. all of those will be affected by cuts. things may take longer. there may be aspects of things we don't get to as thoroughly as we would like under other circumstances. our job is to limit any negative affect and prioritize, part of the leadership job. >> all right. dr. coburn, please proceed. >> secretary lute, i know you know i app
be operational environment. >> you sound confident that that will lead to improvements, any standards that need to be created making sure they -- >> they have 50 different entries petition from 37 states that involved. the six identified in the reauthorization bill you quoted, those are being funded by the states themselves with certification from the michael toscano a. in the future you may see every state that has their own test site in order to be able to assure the technology being deployed in the national airspace is safe. >> annie stepanovich, some proponents of drone technology have argued current safeguards provide significant protection of privacy and they know it's we have on the books related to the technology, losses already on the books related to use of other technologies that can overlap and include this type of technology. certain remedies that provide certain remedies for violations of those laws. some have suggested these legal protection should apply equally to drones and that they may be sufficient to alleviate any constitutional problems for any privacy concerns. in your vi
creation," pope benedict xvi called upon the faithful, and i quote -- "to protect the environment and to safeguard natural resources and the climate, while at the same time taking into due account the solidarity we owe to those living in the poorer areas of our world and to future generations." in his inaugural mass this morning, pope francis said, and i quote -- "please, i would like to ask all those who have positions of responsibility in economic, political and social life and all men and women of goodwill, let us be protectors of creation, protectors of god's plannen scribed in nature -- plan inscribed in nature, protectors of one another and of the environment. as early news reports indicated, the new pope chose his papal name, francis, out of respect for st. francis' sense of obligation to god's creation, and he noted in one of his very earliest comments that our relationship with god's creation is not so good right now. and of course, the pope is not the only one. ecumenical patriot remark bartholomew 1 of constantinople, the spiritual leader of orthodox christians, urges u
, whatever that kind of environment, -- whatever the kind of environment exists in government a lot of wasteful spending and ine fresh sei. there was. the department made clear who was in charge of what. the new or disciplined environment will better enable the -- ensure that all of the operate more cohe'sive and effective agency. they used to have a dismal record when it came to contracts without competition. the departmental leadership has been aggressive in turning the record around. last month a report showed a spending on noncompetitive contract of fiscal year 2012 fell by 90% from 2008. that leaves about $3 billion in contract dollars, that previously spent without competition, now being spend in a manner that gets better value for taxpayers' dollar. competing contracts now that most other agencies. the department is also revamped the process for identifying technological solution at border. they moved away from the model which was contract to a single company to build a virtual fence across the southern border. an effort that went forward without identifying what the border p
healthy, but i did it. and i noticed him talking again and again about the environment. and how proud she was of his achievement in cleaning up the aerts and of the water. he said it and he was proud of it publicly, and yet on the tapes you have him grousing about it not once or twice, but constantly, identify and environmentalism with liberals saying that we have made a mistake. we shouldn't do this. and if i ever have a choice between jobs and the environment, i always go with jobs. don't ever forget it and fire people that say they should go for the environment. it is so hard to understand. on the one side but he said publicly in the state of the union address, not once but three times that i listened to, what you would want and you actually expect bill clinton it's not president obama to say. but privately he is grousing. do you see in the 50's a man that is at war with himself over what he believes? >> i can see that. one of the most interesting things following this thread of mixing and civil rights, i mentioned the trip to africa and 67, and that's where we met martin luther king,
. whether for me or others in lebanon. i grew up in an environment where we did tend to look to the west for support, or help. but i have a lot of friends who grew up on the other side of the divide who don't see the u.s. the way my friends or my family do. but inevitably america is a superpower and it comes with sharp elbows sometimes and big motorcades and big force tresses as embassies and that can be a bit -- grating on the local population. so it was interesting or perhaps revealing for me to be on the other side all of a sudden. it's just a totally different prism through which to look at my open country. so i'm sitting there in the cop vow, and just a few cars ahead of me is another car in the same motorcade surrounded by security escorts, and there is the secretary of state, and there is jeffrey feldman, who is now assistant secretary of state who used to be ambassador to beirut, and it was his convoy that used to annoy people in beirut. used to annoy me when is was stuck at an intersection waiting for him to drive through. and i think it's always worth remembering that you have
in that environment. and became a recommendation not only to add forces, but to change strategies. and i think that the idea of adding forces and changing strategies came in part from the military. and from the development of the counterinsurgency doctrine that general petraeus had overseen at fort leavenworth, and as importantly, the idea of the way the battlefield was developing, developed by general order you know, the second-in-command in iraq. at that time surfing -- since he was responsible for designing the operation and had as his mission built to make a rapid transition to the iraqi security forces under increasingly degrading conditions. i think that he very fundamentally saw what was needed in theater. he recommended that happened to coincide with some of the other things being developed in washington. >> host: i guess that sometimes i don't understand the complete timeline. people associate petraeus and the surge, and was a petraeus counterinsurgency manual and doctrine are coming to the top, ma or was it the search and petraeus was the right man for the job, which came first? >> g
that people are not quite ready for we are not here to hold their hand. we want a friendly environment and want them to consider new ideas but my job is to give them new ideas but challenge them to think in new ways. >> host: when you meet students can you now predict who will be successful and who want? >> no. not have first because they are pleasant most will be successful. that is the good news but it is almost impossible to predict. >> host: what are some of the downfalls of the first year of college? >> there are a lot of distractions. that is the biggest downfall of not paying attention what they need to do. not going to class, not getting assignments done, not studying. to make sure they have the best opportunities. >> host: what is the most common question? what they ought to be doing is in class on a regular basis engaging with the material if they are there if it is part of the dialogue failed no blood is on the test. >> host: has personal technology changed? >> yes. probably for the better but me before the words that we have to compete with these other students' attention t
in that environment it was a constant topic of conversation and then of course in the 60's as my grandfather became interested in his own fbi file because he too was followed and used the freedom of information act to get a hold of his file and the was of great interest because he was completely purged and documents were missing. i became fascinated in the whole period and that did lead me to become interested in the topic. >> in your talk about sabotage fought are you talking like they have factories or something? >> de savage tauscher area what have related to the shipping. one of the early mandates was to come and protect the british cargos and shipping so they did petrel the ports and some of the early complaints about the irregulars is that stevenson's bouygues or beating up nazis on the of dock with no due process. that would have been the area of sabotage. the germans. the original mandate was to come in and identify the nazi sympathizers and german organizations in this country. they vastly overstaffed that and did all kinds of spying on our politicians and meddling in our own political pro
because we have a different value set that cares about the commitment to the environment. almost every company that has been started by a millennials has some kind of social backside to it, whether it's a commitment from the beginning to being green or whether it's actually baked into the mission of the company. this is a generation that is not buying homes. they are not getting married. they are the lowest car ownership in a long time. these are like the basic fundamental concepts of our economy. no one ever thought about the value to buy a home. basing our economy on homeownership and marriage and all these things. i am not an economist so i don't know how that is actually going to transform the economy but it's something that economy should be paying a lot more attention to. when we talk about young people not having a bright future in older people are incredibly pessimistic about this generation's future. it's because the economic futures based on these things like homeownership in marriage. if all of these things are delayed the picture looks different. >> host: what kind of effec
to tell people we're going to cut the subsidies, but in this post arab spring environment, they are inclined to take things some people. and the country is $500 billion in foreign reserves, so it's hardly broke, but there are saudis financial institutions who estimate that the government spending will exceed government revenues by 2014. goes after the arab spring when king abdullah came home from back surgery, he passed out $130 billion to the society on top of a $180 billion annual budget. so more money for students stipends, more money to the religious establishment, more money to everyone, and created a minimum-wage for the first time for saudis. obviously, not for foreigners. and lastly, is the royal family itself, the third pillar of stability which i think is weakening. the biggest internal issue in the kingdom i think is the aged and confirmed leadership. this latest saudi state was declared in 1932 by abdullah al saud. and when he died in 1953, the crown has passed from one of his, first to his eldest son and then from brother to half-brother to half-brother. so ki
this environment possible. >> rice smith was the director of -- was he is the -- he was the director of the whole school, right? >> yeah. >> yeah, for many years. and he took over after elizabeth irwin died. >> right. '44, a couple years after she died. but he was called before -- [inaudible] and he was asked if he had communist teachers, and he told them it was none of their business. [laughter] >> that's right. and he was a -- and more than i think being a sort of old left sort of new york fellow, he was a sort of new england yankee, you know sort of guy. not necessarily terribly liberal or, you know, more independent yankee. they don't talk to -- about him a lot. angela spoke about him very fondly, because she remembers that when she first came to the school, she came a week before the school opened to just sort of get oriented with the people who were, who she was staying with. and she just remembers him, you know, smiling at her and being very courtly and proper which i think was, you know, a good, you know, reminded her of the south. because it was just amazing to her when she went around t
of the economy because we have a different value set that cares about the commitment to the environment almost any company started by a millennial has some kind of social back to it in some way. it's a commitment to being green or whether it is actually baked into the mission of the company and this is a generation that is sent by teeing homes, they are not getting married, the lowest car ownership l long time, these are the basic fundamental concept of the economy. no one has ever fought about what if people suddenly didn't think it was valuable to buy a home for a long time we faced our economy on homeownership, marriage and of these kind of things, so i'm not an economist, so i don't know how that is actually going to transform the economy but it is something that economists should be paying a lot more attention to when we talk about young people not having a bright future and people are incredibly pessimistic about this generation to have a future it is because with homeownership and marriage and so all those things are being delayed but those are different. a generation interested in crea
america's role in the world and it rapidly changing strategic environment, and about america's interests looking forward. and finally i would add the qualification for today's discussion. unlike most former holders of high office in washington, he has been willing over and over again to step outside conventional wisdom when the issue warranted it, taking some risks with his own reputation. general mcmaster is one of a very come one of the most prominent of a very small, very elite, very important class of individuals who have earned the title warrior soldier. he, too, has been willing to critically examine the past, and has done so with such power that rather than ended his military career, the work is ultimately advanced it. his ph.d thesis contained widely influential book, dereliction of duty, lyndon johnson, robert mic, the joint chiefs mic, the joint chiefs of staff, and the lies that led to vietnam. i think the title gives you some idea of his appetite for straight talk. is equally known for brilliance as a combat commander, earning a silver star for leadership in the 1991 gulf war
] ♪ ♪ [applause] >> so being in a classroom environment, i usually get in a lot of debates with professors and teachers, so i'm going to give everybody a tip on how to debate a liberal for the upcoming year. if they ever say liberalism works, just say look at illinois. i'm ooh from illinois, and if you want to see liberal policies at work, come to illinois. we have about $100 billion in unfunded pensions, our last four governors in jail, it's one of the most corrupt governments not just in the country -- time magazine rated the most corrupt goth -- governments in the world. number one was venezuela, number two was north korea, number three was illinois. [laughter] now, illinois' really bad, but if i take a drive about an hour and a half north on i-94, i start to get a smile on my face, and i pass into the dairy state. [cheers and applause] i get a smile because i know i'm in a state that has a leader. a state that has a leader that stood up to special interests, that looked the unions in the eye and made reforms that were not really popular at the time but are now proven effective. conserv
to reflect the global security environment. the military, and the growing budget, currently the current strategy as well. starting with the strategic guidance issued in january 2012. it seems that we are falling into a trap of creating strategies entirely on how quickly we can cut defense budgets rather than as a result give an honest assessment. i am very much concerned. i always thought that the major mission of the federal government is to protect the homeland. we have to get back to that mentality and recognize the threat and you guys are in the right position to do that. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, senator. admiral? >> chairman, ranking member, members of the committee. thank you very much for taking time to hear from myself, general jacoby and general kelly. i always say that i feel safe when i'm with a big marine general and a big army general. it is probably the safest and i could be up your wet. thank you for having us and putting us together for this panel. as the chairman mentioned, rounding out for years in my current position. before that i was lucky enough to b
-chairs heard of the need for an environment of intellectual curiosity that encourages innovation. so, third, i want to hold hack-a-thons in tax-heavy cities like san francisco, austin, denver and new york to forge relationships with developers and stay on the cutting edge. fourth, once our new operation is up and running, we'll embark on a data and digital road show to demonstrate what campaigns and state parties can do to enhance their own operations. the report recommended getting early buy-in from all partners. fifth, we'll upgrade gop.com as a platform, redesigning it to better utilize social media and serve an increasingly mobile audience. sixth, we're going to be setting up an rnc field office in the san francisco area. as we learned with visits to the silicon valley and conversations with top tech firms, many of the best minds are on the other side of the country. having an office there will make it easier for technologynologists -- technologists to join in our efforts and serve as a hub for our data and digital political training. by doing all of this, we'll enter 2014 and 2016 with a
the executive editor called me and said he thought i would do better in an unstable environment. he was sending me to washington. so that was the first. if you move on to women, this becomes a difficult and a different chapter because there were only 20% of the original group or women. you could not do the same thing of just measuring them. so our brave researchers went out and kept interviewing women right through, until we got a pattern of women, from 1978 to the present. now, get to -- this is what it really sort of looked like in the beginning. and it's pretty dismal. okay. this is judy woodruff, and she graduates from duke in 1968. and she says: my spring break i went to atlanta. i interviewed with all three affiliate news directors, two of them barely gave me the time of day. the third, an abc affiliate news director, this was the station that was doing one newscast over the weekend, he said, i could use a gopher, a news room secretary. you can answer the phone, pick up my mail. i worked for them for a year and a half. the last six months they hired me to do the 11:00 p.m. sunday night w
set that cares about commitment to the environment. almost every company hat has been started bay millenial has some kind of social back side to it in some way, whether it's a commitment from the beginning to being green or actually bake into the mission of the company, and this is a generation that is not buying homes. they're not getting married. the lowest car ownership in a long time. these are the basic fundamental concepts of our economy. people are going to -- no one ever thought about that, what if suddenly people didn't think it was val tubal buy a home? for a long time we based our economy on home ownership and marriage all these things. so, i'm not an economist. i don't know what the -- how that's actually going to transform the economic but it's something that the economists should be paying more attention to when we talk about young people not having a bright future and older people are incredibly pessimistic about this generation's future. at it because it's based on these big large purchases, home ownership and marriage. all those being delayedful the picture looks
as we've really created institutions and our community and environment where everybody else wanted to achieve access to care. the party had conversation another these deceptions deceptions and health care services or deception in providers. we also have to knowledge the historical experiences of mistreatment and mistrust in communities of color as well as lgbt communities have experienced discrimination, but also discrimination trying to get access to the system. as a look at health care reform implementation, it's not just that the benefits for quite. it's about whether or not the lgbt americans were overwhelmingly and acted will have access to this health care services they need. at the end of 80s talking about the treatment cascade for the analysis by age and race is that a younger american people of color is less likely to experience depression and less likely to be engaged in the health care system. there's a story behind that we haven't necessarily cut to the heart of, but if are going to address health disparities, will have a chance that has to be seated in conversation or
. that is designed in which case they will certify the platform, the operator and the operational environment. >> be some fairly confident that will lead to improvements come at any making sure -- >> most definitely. get 50 different countries petition from 37 states involved in the six identified in the reauthorization bill are being funded by the states. in the future, every state can have their own test site in order to ensure the technology deployed in the national airspace system backspace. >> ms. stepanovich, some proponents of sub for, said the technology argue current safeguards provides a significant protection of privacy and they know we have on the books related to the subject knowledge he, was third in the books related to use of other technologies that can overlap and include this type of technology. certain remedies that provide civil remedies for violations of those laws. some have suggested legal protections should apply the only two drones and may be sufficient to alleviate constitutional problems are privacy concerns. in your view, is this approach correct and what are the m
to help the environment, then we are having an audit that shows mismanagement of this easements it kind of makes the farmers behind the eight ball so to speak in what they are trying to do. so i guess my question, do you believe that the mismanagement of funds is diverting resources from individual who needed the most and will you continue to monitor the management of these conservation programs? >> let me make two comments and then i'm going to deferred to mr. harden for more specifics and i appreciate your question. we are very aware of conservation programs and how they and rcs is managing them and to point out we have done a number of audits over the past number of years on different aspects of the conservation program, and we continue to watch the programs because there are many factions that the agency can take to improve the management. with respect to the specific audit, gil i don't know if you know whether the actions have been inland to get. >> we have an agreement on all of the recommendations but that when i have to go back and check on. given the age i would assume they are
for that cycle of prosperity that i described to happen. the job of our government is to create an environment where people are encouraged to and it is easier for them to risk the money they have access to in order to start up a new business or grow an existing business so they can hire more people and create more jobs for others. there's a lot of things that government can do to help create that environment but there are few that are being discussed. i want to point to three. the first thing is predictability. what do i mean by predictability? what i mean by that is that when someone decides i'm going to open up a business, one of the things that encourages them to hire people is that they know what tomorrow's going to look like. they know what the taxes are going to be, they know what the laws are going to be, they know what the economy's going to look like, and so they feel encouraged because they can pl plan, because they know what tomorrow looks like. imagine now for a moment if you are a businessman or a businesswoman and is deciding whether to hire five people next year or not. one of t
to cost them a lot more money and have little benefit on the environment. back in 2008, president obama made this statement: "will america watch as clean energy jobs and industry of the future flourish in countries like spain, japan, and germany?" that's what he said. we need to emulate spain, japan and germany. but spain right now is having to cut back dramatically on its really forward-leaning green mandates. they went probably further or as far as any country in europe. it's been a total disappointment. they are reducing their subsidies. their economy is in shambles, and they're not doing well. "the financial times," just february of this year wrote this -- quote -- "the spanish government's latest bid to cut its growing debts to the country's energy sector is expected to slash profits at renewable energy companies asthma tkreud continues to -- as madrid continues to grapple with a $37 billion deficit built up through the years of subsidies." they go on to say "in akiona, spain's second largest wind power operator, shares in that company have tumbled almost 20% with analysts expect t
strong, to protect our communities and environment and uphold the sacred commitment that we have made to our veterans. mr. president, i believe that our budget reflects the values and priorities of the vast majority of families across our country. it is a responsible and credible approach, and it offers a clear path to a balanced and bipartisan deal. house republicans are debating a very different approach this week. the proposal that passed through their budget committee would be devastating for our economic recovery and threaten millions of jobs. it would make extreme cuts to the investments in infrastructure and education and innovation that we need right now to lay down a strong foundation for a broad-based economic growth. it would dismantle medicare and would cut off programs to support the middle class and most vunchl families and it would do all that while refusing to ask the wealthiest americans and biggest corporations to even contribute their fair share. mr. president, the american people are going to have an opportunity to examine these budgets side by side over the coming
about as chairman of the environment and public works committee because without being able to move people and move goods, our nation will not be a leading economic power. so i thank you and i yield back to senator coons. mr. coons: i thank my good friend from california and the other members of the budget committee who have worked so hard to pull together this proposal, this package, this budget resolution that comes to the floor today. mr. president, i think this is a great week for the united states congress. we are at loose in stark contrast, presenting to the people of the united states a budget path forward adopted boy the republican-led house and a budget path forward adopted by the democrat-led budget committee, and hopefully not just debated but adopted in this chamber this week. let me briefly summarize the main points made by my colleagues. first, as the senator from california emphasized, one of the core elements of the ryan budget plan that gives us real pause and concern is that it doesn't keep our promises to our seniors, to our veterans, to our most vulnerable popula
more on that. if we could talk about is the changing energy environment globally and especially in the united states, as the united states becomes more self-sufficient rather than independent, and how that impacts the relationship with our countries? >> yes, you know, i think that -- we have had some divergences. some of it comes down to messaging, as we were saying before. we have the same sorts of reservations and worries about exactly what is the u.s. policy and will the u.s. actually back up those policies as the other allies do. that extend beyond the middle east. the divergence has been the ascendancy of islamic groups. the united states have been relatively sanguine about that. many are worried about the intentions of groups like the muslim brotherhood. when it comes to iran, i think there is a concern amongst the allies we focus on what is exclusively on the nuclear issue, almost as if we are having an arms control negotiations. many of our allies see it in a much broader sense, causing trouble in the region. again, i don't think that the administration doesn't see those
institutions that have been welcomed into tenet and an environment where everybody else wanted to reduce us access to care. and you start having a conversation around that and where this would be disrupted in health care services or disruptions in providers. we also have to acknowledge the historical experiences of mistreatment and mistrust in commuters of color as well as lgbt communities have experienced discrimination from health care providers, and also just experienced discrimination just trying to get access to the system. so as we look at health care implementation is not just going to be about what the benefits look like but it's going to be about whether not the lgbt of americans are being overwhelmingly impacted by the hiv epidemic are going to have access to these services that they need. thing about the treatment cascade and one of the things we know from recent analysis of the treatment cascade, by age and race is that younger americans are less likely experience -- less likely to engage in health care system. there's a story behind that don't have the necessary gotten to the h
't it be the people in the most fragile work environments? won't it be the people with less skills? won't they be the ones that would suffer the most? don't we have an obligation as a united states senate to reach out to the house and say we get it, this is dangerous. we don't know for sure where we're going, but we know shame on us if we allow decent, hard-working people struggling to get by right now to get hammered by another fiscal crisis that erskine bowles and alan simpson virtually guaranteed was on the way. i think we have a duty. i think we have a responsibility. i think when the american people find out it's not going to take massive slashing of spending, as our colleagues say, a lot of the programs that we can get can be more efficient than they have ever been, and we get just as much benefit even if they don't get as much money. there hadn't been any reform, any management improvements in this government in decades. i will just say politically i thought that was the greatest offer that governor romney had. he was a very good manager. in my opinion, we have had enough speech
jobs, clean up the environment, and be able to keep our way of life going on the chesapeake bay. so, madam president, you can see why today we just had three great marylanders, each doing a very different thing, but what i'm so proud of with, you know, captain cullen, larry symms, christina quigley is that each in their own way was trying to make a difference, wanted to protect america. the other was to protect jobs and a way of life on the chesapeake bay. and the other to inspire young women not only to be ready for the playing fields of la crosse but for the playing fields of life. all three, in her own way, were inspirational leaders. all three, in their own way, made a difference in the lives of the people that they came in touch w i just want to say, god bless them and god treat them kindly and may their souls rest in peace. madam president, i yield the floor. ms. mikulski: madam president, i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: quorum call:
at the same time enabling the value of the institutions to create an environment where people are secure and prosperous and free. government, it's important to remember, cannot create civil society, but it can kill it. over the past 80 years, the federal government has expanded well beyond its constitutional limits. history demonstrates that as the power of the federal government increases, the ability to self-govern diminishes to a corresponding degree, and as self-governance decreases, so, too, does the influence of the institutions of civil society. soon the ability to instill faith, confidence and trust among individuals and communities is replaced by the false promises of big government. america is extraordinary, not because of who we are but because of what we do. despite the current crushing weight of our bloated federal bureaucracy, we can still see the strength of our nation's fabric through the intertwining actions of the genuine heroes all around us. they are often disguised as the daily deeds that everyday citizens perform, and they perform them every single day, but they are
in a very unstable environment, a dangerous environment or maybe the one of the parents that is, god forbid, involved in this pregnancy. that's where there are courts involved in this so they can overright this. that's why this has exceptions for rape or incest or medical emergencies or a hostile home. and so this is an important point and i hope we can garner the support of as many members as possible. mrs. murray: mr. president, i yield my time to the senator from california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, the senate is not in order. the presiding officer: the senate will come to order. the senate will come to order. mrs. boxer: mr. president, the rubio amendment hurts families. it is opposed by respected doctors' organizations and many womens' groups. colleagues, urn th under the ruo amendment, a doctor and a grandmother would go to jail if the grandmother brought her grandchild across state lines, say, after she was raped. senator rubio insists that only a parent be there. but what if the mom's ill or the dad's in afghanistan or she's scared to death to tell her mom or her dad? colleagues,
extreme position to take to prevent the environmental protection agency from protecting the environment. my amendment is an amendment that says that -- that the carbon emission standards must be cost-effective and we all agree that they should be cost-effective. it should be base upon best available science and benefit low-income and middle-class families. i think we could all agree, i would hope, on the amendment that i would offer and i would hope we would do that and allow the environmental protection agency to carry out its critical mission on behalf of the people of this country. mr. inhofe: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from oklahoma. mr. inhofe: madam president, i'd like to ask one question of the author and then make a comment. first of all, this does not authorize the e.p.a. to regulate in any way. this sets the standards; is that correct? mr. cardin: the senator is correct. mr. inhofe: okay. madam president, i support this amendment. i suggest that we voice vote it. the presiding officer: if there's no further debate, all those in favor say aye. all those
, truly. because my whole life i've cared about environment and i've cared about infrastructure. and the way the senate works, they put those two together. so not only do i get to talk about clean air and clean water and safe drinking water and cleaning up superfund sites and protecting the health of our families, but i also get to talk about jobs, jobs, jobs that are created when we build roads and bridges and highways. and water systems. but there is something that does not bring us together on that committee and that's the issue of climate change. and so what i've decided to do is to come down to the floor every monday that it's possible for me to do it, and the floor is available, to talk just a few minutes about the devastating consequences of unchecked climate disruption. and i want to discuss and put into the record every week the latest scientific information. on march 4, i started these talks and i talked about a front-page story in the "usa today" that spotlighted the impacts of climate change unfolding around us. the story is the first in a yearlong series called "why
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